Grangers and Beekeepers Association complete Hedgerow Project 2020

Using mostly native California plants from local nurseries and the beekeepers gardens, the Really Good Bees Inspirational Garden was planted behind the Grange Hall in October. Read the story about how this collaborative project came together while our hall has been closed due to the pandemic.

Home Gardener Produce Exchange/Donation returns

Produce exchange

 

What:  Join us again for our local project to redistribute homegrown produce and eliminate food waste.  It is an opportunity to trade surplus items from your garden for something you don’t have.  You may also bring produce that you have gleaned (with permission of course) from a neighbor’s yard.  Plant starts are welcome for sharing and trading.  At the end of the exchange period, all left over produce will be donated to a food recovery partner.

Update: This year, we’ll be wearing face masks and keeping at least a 6-foot distance between each of us. Please put on clean gloves or sanitize your hands prior to unloading your starts/produce and when you are packed up to leave the exchange. Please follow the directions of the exchange host when putting out your starts/produce and when looking for items you would like to take.
We encourage gardeners to plant extra so that we are able to donate produce throughout the season to our local food pantries and community members who are in need of healthy food.

Where:  The Sebastopol Grange  6000 Sebastopol Rd/Hwy 12

When:  5:00 – 5:45 pm on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays – May 26 through October 27.

Dates:  May 26, June 9, June 23, July 14, July 28, Aug 11, Aug 25, Sept 8, Sept 22, Oct 13, Oct 27

Contact:  Dena at dena@rahus.org or 707-484-5703

Non-Gardener Participants:  Let’s talk- maybe volunteering your time, not your produce is what works for you.

Song Circle featured Holistic Resistance

Song Circle

The Sebastopol Grange had one of its most well attended Song Circles on January 31st, with nearly 90 people in attendance, from children to elders. Our songleaders were cousins Aaron Johnson and Porsha Beed who make up a team of change makers called Holistic Resistance, a group who has dedicated their lives to dismantling racism through reaching for each other and building relationships via song circles, programs and workshops. These good folks are all heart and soul and many people left that evening saying it was one of the best singing experiences they’ve ever had. We will definitely be having them back again!

Song Circle

Carbon Conversations: Regenerative Agriculture:  A Natural Climate Solution

Notes from the workshop held at the Grange on 15 January 2020

The website, drawdown.org, is where Project Drawdown has compiled the top 80 solutions to climate change.  Regenerative Agriculture is their #11 solution.

Speaker: Lauren Lum—California Climate and Agriculture Network (CalCAN)

Lauren comes from a background of farming in Vacaville with large scale conventional agriculture.  She reflected on both the joy of growing up in the farming lifestyle, but also the hardship for her family to make a living.

Impacts of Climate change

Agronomic impacts:

  • Drought/flood cycles
  • Erratic and extreme weather
  • New pests & diseases
  • Decreased chill hours
  • Subsidence

Economic, health and social

  • Reduced yields
  • Job losses
  • Farmworker health
  • Public health

CalCAN is a coalition working on policy for sustainable agriculture.

Current Greenhouse Gas Targets for California

Reduce 40% below 1990 levels by 2030

Carbon Neutral by 2045

Agriculture’s Climate Solutions:

  • Create the farm as a whole system.
  • Healthy soil—build up the nutrients, feed microbes.
  • Keep soil covered and minimize disruption.
  • Year-round planting—keep more roots in the ground.
  • Biodiversity & Conservation Planting– Example: Owl boxes to minimize rodents.
  • Water & Energy—water is contained better when there is better soil/irrigation is more efficient.
  • Farmland Conservation—1 acre of urban land emits 70x the greenhouse gases as an acre of farmed land.

Climate Smart Ag Programs

4 programs where farmers can get money to support regenerative practices:

  • Sustainable Ag Lands Conservation Program
  • Healthy Soils Programs
  • State Water Efficiency & Enhancement Program
  • Alternative Manure Management Program

These programs are Cap-and-Trade funded.  California is the only state with a Cap-and-Trade program.

Governor Newsom is proposing different options for future funding for climate work and resilience, so we need to continue to exert political pressure to make sure that funding continues for ag programs.

Ways to get involved

  • Vote
  • Support your local farmer
  • Work with your local Resource conservation District. Sonoma Resource Conservation District.  (707) 569-1448/ Gold Ridge Conservation District (707) 823-5244
  • Work with Daily Acts to convert your landscape.

Speaker: Elizabeth Kaiser from Singing Frogs Farm

Elizabeth and her family have been doing no till farming for about 10 years. They farm 2.5 acres of fields on an 8-acre parcel at Ferguson and Mill Station Rd. in the Atascadero valley bottom where it is quite cool.  They have been farming for 14 years.  They grow food for CSA members and farmers markets.  98% sold locally.

Soil Organic Matter

Soil is made of minerals, air and water (95%).  What is alive is the 5% consisting of organisms, roots, and humus.  It is important because that is where the biology is in the soil.

Tillage is one of the major practices that reduces the organic matter level in the soil. Tillage increases surface area and the organic matter is blown off.

At their farm they have increased the soil health by increasing the percentage of soil organic matter to 9 or 10 %.

Managing for soil health

  1. Disturb the soil as little as possible.
  2. Keep living plants in the soil as often as possible. (photosynthesis, re-synthesis, exudation, humification). They get 3-8 sequential economic crops per year per bed.
  3. Grow many different species—crop diversity (flowers/perennials.)
  4. Keep the soil covered all the time.
  5. Incorporate animals and think outside the livestock box! (wild animals)

Go from one photosynthesizing plant to another photosynthesizing plant.

Three Principles of their farm: No Till– Be Intensive—Be Ecological

Healthy soils give the resilience to all of the disasters be it flooding, drought, fire because of the ability of the soil to retain water and air.  Recovery is quicker in healthy soils.

She referenced the ETC Group or Action group on Erosion, Technology and Concentration and a report they put out called, “Who will feed us?” (etcgroup.org) and the result of their findings is that small scale agriculture is what is needed, so we need to do everything we can to support small farmers.

 

Respectfully submitted by Carol Henderson

The Grange celebrates a new year at our Inaugural Ball!

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New President Laura Shafer accepted the gavel from Jeanna Collet as we celebrated the promise of a new year at our January 28th potluck meeting!

Grangers presented outgoing president Jeanna with a basket of appreciation, a lime tree for the front of the Grange and a six-month membership to Coaches Corner Gym was given to Jeanna.

Laura encouraged us to ask: What can I do? What am I willing to do? to make the community a better place.

Photos by Dorothy Morgan.

Grange recognized for 120 years of service

Grange wins award

 

Grange awardVice President Hrieth Pezzi, outgoing President and Co-Lecturer Jeanna Collet, Treasurer and Co-Lecturer Gary Abreim and President Laura Shafer accept a Certificate of Recognition for the Sebastopol Grange’s 120 years of service to the Grange and to our community, awarded by Hessel Grange President Vince Scholten.

Gary was also awarded a pin for his service as State Grange Treasurer. Congrats to the Sebastopol Grange!

Community Sing with Mamuse and Debbie Nargi-Brown was a joyful event!

On December 10th we had a sold out Community Sing with local song leaders Mamuse and Debbie Nargi-Brown of Santa Cruz. About 100 people came out on a rainy Tuesday night to join hearts and voices in song. We had a wonderful connective time and most people left with big smiles on their faces. Community Singing brings a lot of joy! Big thanks to the Grange for making this event possible.

Megan Eberhardt

Granger member and Song Circle leader

Support for our neighbors encamped on The Joe Rodota Trail

Dec. 1, 2019

A message from long-time Grange officer Gary Abreim:

KayLynne and I have recently gotten involved with some folks who are serving the encampment community on the Rodota Trail.  Last weekend there was a major cleanup and many loads of trash were taken to the dump. Today toilet paper, ponchos, gloves and plastic tubs to keep possessions dry were given along with tamales and soup.

The Roberts sisters, Rochelle and Jillian, were able this week to get 8 porta potties placed.  It’s truly a labor of loving service and more voices are speaking out for permanent shelter.  With these storms they are hoping to create some temporary shelter too.

The sisters have an inspiring commitment and also carry the financial load.  They created a gofundme site – Funds for the Less Fortunate – four days ago with a $5000 goal.

[Gary proposed to the Grange Executive Committee that the Grange donate $300, which was enthusiastically approved. He invites Grangers and friends who want to help to contribute to the fund]

I also encourage you to visit the trail and meet the residents and see if you get called to support our houseless community in some way.   If you meet Rochelle or Jillian let them know you are from the Grange.  At some point we might want to do a fund raiser event with them.

The group has a Facebook page – Sonoma County Acts of Kindness – where you can read about ways to help.
Gary Abriem
Let’s take them over the $5000 goal!

It’s becoming ever more clear that there is no them…..just us.

 

 

Gary

 

 

West County Craft Faire, Nov 23 & 24, 2019

Craft Fair at Sebastopol Grange

The Sebastopol Grange is hosting the

19th Annual West County Craft Faire

Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 23rd and 24th, from 11 am to 4 pm.
This event is FREE and FUN!

We will have over 40 North Bay crafters to offer their hand made goods.

Our Crafters make a variety of items: jewelry, soaps and lotions, wearable goods, ornaments, felted creations, and home crafted fun of all shapes and sizes. A unique way to shop very locally for the holidays.

There will be a food truck on both days providing food for sale.

We always have some yummy beverages in the kitchen to enjoy by donation.

A selection of gift baskets, full of the fair’s wares, will be raffled each day to benefit a local youth climate action group. This is known to be one of the most exciting raffles.

What began in homes and backyards by a group of friends to build strong community support and resilience, grew and joined with the Grange in 2011 to create a local market for crafters and shoppers that has benefited numerous non-profits in Sonoma County including the Ceres Project, the Women’s Room Shelter, the Inter-Faith Food Pantry, the California HomeMakers Association and the Bike to School Coalition to name a few past recipients.

The Sebastopol Grange is located at 6000 Sebastopol Ave, on Hwy 12. For more information please contact: grangeevent@gmail.com

Grange Ole Opry w/ The Easy Leaves, Trevor Mcspadden & Friends at the Grange on Friday, Sept. 27

California is a long, long way from the hallowed halls of country music's crown jewel, The Ryman Auditorium. Yet even thousands of miles from the Grand Ole Opry, it's influence can be heard all across the western region. Not to mention, The Golden State has plenty to claim in it's own contributions to Country Music's vast canon. From the labor camps of the Central Valley to The Polomino Club in Hollywood, and from the Kern River to dusty roadhouses peppering the state's vast highway system - A myriad of West Coast nooks and crannies of have played host to some of the greatest names in Honky Tonk history as they refined and crafted a brand of country music that intermingles their own roots influences with sounds coming in on the airwaves from Nashvilles Grand Ole Opry. This brand of California Country, closely assiciated Bakersfield - where it's purveyors cut their teeth in a rough & tumble honky tonk scene in the 50s & 60s - would eventually spread throughout the globe and make their presence felt on those very same Nashville airwaves that made Roy Acuff & Ernest Tubb household names. It's with a sense of homage to the Grand Ole Opry's omnipresent influence Country Music and the mid-century California Country sounds which took the world by storm when Buck Owen burst onto the national scene that we bring you - 'The Grange Ole Opry'! -6pm Doors -Beer & Wine -Meat & Veggie Hand Pies by Pye -Kids Free! -Kids Activities

California is a long, long way from the hallowed halls of country music’s crown jewel, The Ryman Auditorium. Yet even thousands of miles from the Grand Ole Opry, it’s influence can be heard all across the western region. Not to mention, The Golden State has plenty to claim in its own contributions to Country Music’s vast canon. From the labor camps of the Central Valley to The Polomino Club in Hollywood, and from the Kern River to dusty roadhouses peppering the state’s vast highway system – A myriad of West Coast nooks and crannies of have played host to some of the greatest names in Honky Tonk history as they refined and crafted a brand of country music that intermingles their own roots influences with sounds coming in on the airwaves from Nashvilles Grand Ole Opry.

This brand of California Country, closely associated Bakersfield – where its purveyors cut their teeth in a rough & tumble honky tonk scene in the 50s & 60s – would eventually spread throughout the globe and make their presence felt on those very same Nashville airwaves that made Roy Acuff & Ernest Tubb household names.

It’s with a sense of homage to the Grand Ole Opry’s omnipresent influence on Country Music and the mid-century California Country sounds which took the world by storm when Buck Owen burst onto the national scene that we bring you – ‘The Grange Ole Opry’!

-6pm Doors

-Beer & Wine

-Meat & Veggie Hand Pies by Pye

-Kids Free!

-Kids Activities

Tickets $20 can be purchased online.